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Once you’ve bought your tent, your next major consideration will be what equipment to buy to ensure you get the best night’s sleep possible. Here’s a guide to help you choose.

Sleeping on the Floor?

Whilst some people can adapt to the challenges of sleeping on the floor, sleeping in a regular sleeping bag with only the groundsheet between yourself and the floor does not often lead to a comfortable night’s sleep. For some added comfort, you have two main options – a camping mattress or a Sleeping  Bed. Both offer their own advantages and are discussed in more detail below. But whilst both provide added comfort, neither will raise your body particularly far off the ground. Therefore if you don’t like the sensation of sleeping close to the ground, however comfortable, there is also the option of buying a camp bed. Whilst it will not be suitable for some smaller, lower tents, inside a larger family tent it offers you a solution to this problem.

Camping Mattress

There are several factors to consider in terms of deciding which sleeping mat or camping mattress to choose. The first is perhaps the simplest – do you need a single or a double mattress? A key factor in deciding this is to look at the floor space inside your tent, as this will determine how large a mattress you can actually fit inside. The second factor is whether to go for an inflatable mattress or a foam mattress that remains at a constant thickness. Inflatable mattresses can offer greater levels of comfort, but must be inflated and deflated before and after use. A third option is a self-inflatable mattress such as the Quechua A300 Mattress, which offer a compromise between the convenience of a foam mattress and the comfort of an inflatable mattress.

Another important consideration is the ‘folded size’ of the mattress. Whilst a mattress might fit inside your tent, but if it is too large for you to actually transport it then it will not be a worthwhile purchase. Studying the folded size (and weight) of the mattress is essential for any backpackers, but even if you will have access to a car during your camping holiday, it is still worth considering as a mattress with a smaller folded size will be easier to store at home following your holiday.

Sleeping Bed

The Sleeping Bed offers an alternative to the traditional pattern of buying a separate sleeping bag and mattress, and come in two main varieties. The first is a sleeping bag with an integrated self-inflatable mattress built-in, such as the 15° Sleeping Bed. This built-in mattress can be detached, meaning that both the mattress or the sleeping bag can be used on their own as well as together, offering a 3-in-1 sleeping solution. The other variety is mattresses with integrated duvets such as the Single Sleeping Bed Camp, providing a more portable option for people who prefer duvets to sleeping bags.

Sleeping Bags

Sleeping bags come in a range of varieties, but there are a number of features to consider when deciding which is the best for you. One of the most essential features is the temperature that your sleeping bag is designed to cope with. For example, the O° Quechua Light Hiking Sleeping Bag is designed to be comfortable at O°. Therefore if you are camping in that sort of temperature, it will be an ideal sleeping bag to ensure your temperature is comfortable throughout the night. Yet if you are camping in warm temperatures, other sleeping bags will be more suitable, such as the 20° Basic Camping Sleeping Bag, which is designed for use when the temperature is 20° and above. Therefore identifying the likely temperatures during your camping trip will help you to choose a sleeping bag that will provide the most comfortable night’s sleep. If you will be camping in a wide range of temperatures and don’t want to buy multiple sleeping bags, choose a bag that is suitable for the lowest temperature you expect to encounter as it is easier to find ways to lower the temperature in the tent at night than increase it.

Size is again another important consideration. The sleeping bag should be large enough for you to sleep inside of comfortably, so check both the size and the dimensions prior to buying to ensure that this will be the case. As with the camping mattress, the folded size is also important, particularly for backpackers. The smaller the folded size of your sleeping bag, the more space you’ll have available for additional equipment and supplies. And finally, if you are going to be using the sleeping bag regularly, it is worth investigating whether it is machine washable or suitable for a tumble drier.

 

Bed sheets, duvets and blankets

Sleeping bags are not the only option. Your normal duvets or blankets will work too, and depending on the type of mattress you choose a bed sheet is an option too. The advantages of this set up is that it brings the comforts of home with you when you are camping. However, the major problem is that they are not designed specifically for the purpose of camping. Duvets in particular are notoriously difficult to transport, taking up a lot of space and being difficult to reduce down into a smaller size. This clearly rules them out for anyone backpacking, and even if you have access to a car, anything more than one duvet will be too large for most hatchbacks. However, if do have a car available offering the necessary space, it’s an option that will give you added comfort.

Additional Equipment

If you have perhaps already got a sleeping bag that maybe isn’t completely suitable for what you need to ensure a comfortable night’s sleep, other sleeping equipment can help you get the comfort you need. Liners and pillows can help provide additional comfort, whilst if your sleeping bag is not designed for the cold temperatures you are encountering, then a Fleece Blanket is an option for providing additional warmth. More camping equipment, you can click  Basic Tent Camping Equipment | Sports Related.

(This entry was posted by Colin)

More summer camping information, you can see:

10 best national park campsites across the USA | Sporting Life.

 

Selecting the Right Hiking Equipment Before Going on a Outdoor camping Trip | Sports and Exercise.

Basic Tent Camping Equipment | Sports Related.

What Equipment Do You Need For Yoga?

Actually you don’t need much to start   doing yoga; I’d say you only need a good mat. That’s all. But… Sometimes, just to make the practice more convenient, or to enhance it, we can use various props and wear particular clothes. If you feel like having the mat only is not enough for you, then go on reading, since we’re going to dive into the most popular and needed yoga gear the majority of students use. You can consider it to be a kind of a yoga equipment checklist for beginners, or something.

What Do You Need For a Yoga Class?

 

  • A Yoga Mat

Among the things you need for yoga class a yoga mat is the most essential. Alternatively, you can have a blanket or a yoga towel, which is also popular in Hot or Bikram yoga.

Yoga mats are made of various materials; the better the material is the more expensive the mat. The same is true for the mat’s size: if you want something bigger and thicker, you will have to pay more. But, there is no need to have a huge mat, because it will be difficult to carry it with you to a yoga studio. You can have it at home, of course, but still I think it is not always very practical. You need to get the right mat thickness, as for the size – just let it cover the whole area on the floor where your body lays.

It’s great to have a natural, Eco friendly yoga mat, but such mats are usually quite expensive – can be over $40.

As in the case with mats, the skidless yoga towels also come in various types, materials and prices. Sometimes, a quality towel costs more than a good mat.

Now, although I said that there is no need to get a huge and expensive mat, it doesn’t mean you need to get a cheap trifle. No, a mat is essential and it will be with you during your practice for years! So get a really good one you like and feel comfortable to practice on it.

  • Only a Mat? Oh, Wait!

Actually, there is something else your mat needs: it is either a yoga mat bag or a carrying strap. You will need them to transport your mat to a class. A bag protects your mat from dust, but a strap is easy to use and fast to make your mat ready for the practice. Some mat straps can also be used to aid your practice, which is an additional benefit.

  • What’s Next? Yoga Apparel

The next most important thing after the mat is the yoga apparel. The first thing to look at is the natural material like cotton or linen; also the clothes should be loose enough to allow free movement in various poses. Yoga practice involves flexibility and wide range motions, so make sure you get yoga pants and shirts to facilitate this.

Instead of pants you may want to get leggings – they are fine as long as they are suitable for doing yoga poses. Instead of t-shirts you can have yoga tops, which often are pretty convenient. Some of them have built-in secure bras to provide an appropriate support for female students during their practice.

The next are the yoga socks and gloves (or yoga paws). Actually I prefer to do yoga barefoot and with nothing on my hands. But if you are not into displaying these parts of your body, or it’s just a bit cold in the room you practice in, then you can get a special socks and gloves that provide an adequate grip. Also there are yoga shoes, which can be great to wear in a studio, especially during winter.

  • Yoga Straps and Blocks

Now is the turn for yoga props, namely straps and blocks. These are good for beginners, since the serve to provide “extra arms” and an additional support. “Extra arms” means that when you don’t have enough flexibility to do a pose, you can use a yoga strap to extend your arms. The similar thing is with the yoga blocks – for example, when you do the triangle pose (Trikonasana), and cannot reach the floor with your hand, you can have a block under it to place the palm over. Often these props are recommended for beginners since they not only compensate for your lack flexibility, but also provide extra safety.

Other props include yoga bolsters or yoga pillows, bands, rollers, belts (the same or slightly different from the straps), yoga balls, sandbags. Basically, all these belong to so called ‘optional yoga equipment’.

Is There Any Difference Between Yoga Equipment For Men And For Women?

Not really; the major stuff is the same. The difference is in the apparel of course: pants, t-shirts, socks, etc. But when it comes to mats, straps, bolsters, blocks – all are the same.

When you consider buying yoga supplies, start with the essential gear like a mat and clothes; if after a while you’ll feel like you need some more stuff to aid your practice, then go and get what’s required. But personally, I think there is no need to buy every piece of yoga gear at once. Chances are you won’t use all the things, some will be collecting dust. So start with the most essential yoga equipment for beginners, and proceed to get more if needed.

I hope I made it clear about what you need to start yoga. The main thing, of course, is your desire to go on, and the ability to be regular and gradual in your practice.

P.S. By the way, I completely forgot about doing yoga at home! If you practice at home, then consider buying the best yoga DVD for beginners!

(Source:http://yogayukta.com/739/yoga-equipment-for-beginners/ By:Den)


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